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Their First Dental Visit – Coppell, TX

What to Expect When You First Arrive

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Dental Association (ADA) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD.) all recommend establishing a “Dental Home” for your child by age one. Children who have a dental home early in life are more likely to receive appropriate preventative care, have less need for dental restorations and more likely to be comfortable in a dental setting. Pediatric dentists are not only comfortable with seeing children as infants and young toddlers but they are really experts in this area!

Establishing a dental home early, also gives the family a safety net in case there is a dental emergency. Many falls and accidents happen during those first years of life, and we want to be here for you!

You can help make the first visit to the dentist enjoyable and positive. If your child is old enough (over 3 years of age), your child should be informed of the visit and told that the dentist and their staff will answer any questions about an upcoming procedure, assuming they are old enough to understand. The less to-do concerning the visit at your, the better.

Avoid words around your child that might make them feel fearful for no reason, such as pull, needle, hurt or drill. At our pediatric dental office, we always make an effort to use words that convey a similar message, but are pleasant and non-frightening to the child.

Board-certified pediatric dentists go through intensive testing and training voluntarily in order to prove their knowledge and expertise of the field. When it’s time for your child’s appointment, you can rest knowing that they are truly receiving the best care out there. No matter what service it is that you need below, it’s sure to be performed by those who are in the top of their field.

Timing Your Child’s First Dental Visit

Parents and kids in dental office waiting room

As recommended by The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Dental Association, a visit to the dentist should be scheduled by the child’s first birthday. Dental problems can be easily detected at this young age, treated, and even avoided completely. Furthermore, it can also help to establish a positive relationship between your child and the dentist.

First Dental Visit Expectations

Kids using toy vending machines

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Dental Association (ADA), and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) all recommend establishing a "Dental Home" for your child by one year of age. Children who have a dental home are more likely to receive appropriate preventive and routine oral health care.

The Dental Home is intended to provide a place other than the Emergency Room for parents.

You can make the first visit to the dentist enjoyable and positive. If old enough, your child should be informed of the visit and told that the dentist and their staff will explain all procedures and answer any questions. The less to-do concerning the visit, the better.

It is best if you refrain from using words around your child that might cause unnecessary fear, such as needle, pull, drill or hurt. Pediatric dental offices make a practice of using words that convey the same message, but are pleasant and non-frightening to the child.

Preparing Your Child to See the Dentist

Dental team members and kids in dental treatment area

Start by telling your child that the dentist is friendly and prepared to help them take care of their teeth. Make sure to discuss the visit in an overall positive light, just like you would for any other new experience. The last thing you should do is make them feel that you have any anxiety about going to the dentist. Never use a dental visit as a way to punish or threaten them. Dental visits should be a fun and delightful adventure for any young child.

Dental Office Etiquette

Families in waiting room

When dental visits are pleasant, they can help the child establish a level of trust and confidence that will last a lifetime. Pediatric dentists as well as their staff have been trained to help young, apprehensive children feel good about visiting the dentist and protecting their teeth. With friendly and compassionate professionals and bright and cheerful dental office surroundings, helping your child feel comfortable and at ease while visiting the dentist should be easy.

We also recommend scheduling your youngest children for morning visits. During this time, they are usually more rested and therefore more cooperative.

Scheduling Regular Dental Visits

Family checking in at dental office reception desk

In most cases, we recommend periodic recall appointments twice a year. These include an examination, preventive dental education, a cleaning and fluoride therapy. However, the frequency of these visits can depend on your child’s eating habits; how clean their teeth are kept, and if they have a history of tooth decay.

Appointment Policy

Dental office

Dr. Rozas has combined decades of pediatric dental experience with a great deal of research to train her staff on how to properly schedule and place each appointment. Scheduling in our dental office is constructed so that each child receives the best appointment with the least amount of waiting time. For more helpful information, download our Appointment Policy form below!

Appointment Policy

Patient Forms

Mother completing children's dental paperwork

Before you and your child arrive for their first dental visit with our team, we ask that you complete their new patient forms in advance. We know your time is valuable and we would not want you to be delayed due to paperwork. Download them below!

Current Patient & New Patient Forms

American Dental Association logo American Board of Pediatric Dentistry logo American Academy of Pediatric Dnetistry logo Texas Dental Association logo Light Scalpel logo Mom Approved logo American Laser Study Club logo International Affiliation of Tongue-Tie Professionals logo Dallas Magazine Best logo Greater Dallas Pediatric Dental Society logo